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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> sreenivasan: wall street racked up gains today after the federal reserve chairman, ben bernanke, said interest rates need to stay low. the dow jones industrial average gained more than 91 points to close at 10,374. the nasdaq rose 22 points to close near 2,236. public and private sector workers walked off the job across greece today. it was the second 24-hour strike in the last two weeks aimed at a government austerity plan. demonstrators clashed with police in athens, after a peaceful march had ended. they were protesting plans to cut government spending because of a debt crisis. greece has announced wage freezes, bonus cuts and pension reform over the last month to save almost $7 billion. the u.s. house has stepped up the pressure on health insurance companies. it came a day before the president's bi-partisan summit on health care reform. health correspondent betty ann bowser has the story. >> this meeting will come to order. >> reporter: the target at a house hearing today was wellpoint-- the parent company of california's anthem blue cross. >> corporate executives at wellpoint are thriving
. bernanke said it. a lot of people said it. and then i said it after you said it. >> i know it. and you're on optimist. >> i am an optimist. >> in terms of why i thought it was contained was, first of all, i was talking about subprime and we made the mistake of just simply saying the subprime was not big in relation to a 13, $14 trillion u.s. economy. and what was really going on is we were talking about housing overall and since world war ii, housing, residential home prices, had generally gone up. and the mortgages were just considered to be very safe investments. and so the kind of decline we saw was something that was not envisioned in any kind of model. it wasn't anything that many people that were close it to -- after the fact, it seems obvious to all of us. but the -- and so when you had the kind of decline we saw in housing prices that changed the behavior of those of homeowners, and, also, the other thing you and i were talking about before the show is this -- all of this complexity. so when -- it. >> it's crazy. mortgage-backed securities that were rated triple-a by a bunch of
had hey, ben bernanke, tim geithner and sheila bair at head of the fdic. i know a lot of people in finance and business and government. i cannot think of four people who would have done a better job to get us through that. it is fashionable to look back and look at one little aspect of what was happening our country's financial system froze up during that period. some of you were at a party i was at september 2008 when the talk of what are the money market funds save? when you have 3.5 trillion of funds held by 30 million people who on a sunday night worry about whether they can get their money, that was half of all deposits. you have a panic. you have commercial paper frees up entirely and some of the biggest companies in the united states that are described, worried if they would be payrolls in a short period of time. the six largest bank in the country with domestic deposits washington mutual and the third largest bank, wachovia, needed of shock on a monday morning to survive. most interesting, but this book starts and early september when freddie mac and fannie mae essential
to find someone except in some secondary posts who are true agents of change. tavis: is ben bernanke the man to run the fed? >> i don't think so. you need to clean house broadly. you need to take a reexaminatio of what's happening and really, i think, for another reason and poorpersonperson, these are pp well-meaning people. you need to clean house. you need to start again. what happens is it's like pz anything. if you start cooking something  and you're halfway through the  recipe and you realize that you forgot to put butter in the batter in the beginning and you keep going, it won't work. you have to start again. one little ingredient can spoil the whole thing. tavis: given the chorus is growing louder and louder every day that the money people are the wrong people, i'm sure they're fine people, but given the chorus is growing louder and louder, it's almost to the point of being deafening now, many people think these are the wrong people, how long do you project or think it will be before the president gets the fact that somebody, bernanke, geithner, summers, someone has
in place. we had hank, ben bernanke tim geithner and sheila bair the head of the fdic. i know a lot of people in finance and a lot of people in business and government. and i can't think of for that would have done a better job of getting us through that. now it's kind of fashionable to look back and pick at one aspect or another of what was happening and our country's financial system froze up during that period. some of you in this room were at a party i was at in september of 2008, one to talk was the money market funds saved. if we have 3.5 trillion fun missile by 30 million people who on is and they might are worrying about whether they can get their money that was half of all the process held by u.s. banks at the time you have a panic. you had commercial paper frees up entirely in the biggest companies of the united states and some are described in this book that worried whether they were going to meet their payroll and a short period of time to read the sixth largest bank in the country in terms of the domestic deposits, washington mutual failed over a weekend. you had the th
. people like alan greenspan and ben bernanke gave us the largest downturn since the great depression. that is why we have a huge budget deficit. we didn't have a huge tax cuts. we had stimulus and response to the downturn. we have higher unemployment if we have not had that but let's be clear if we are upset about the deficit greenspan and bernanke, i don't know why we reappointed bernanke. in terms of the entitlement programs, yeah we have a public pension program, which is hugely popular. you look at polling day that-- i was at a conference this morning in social security is over 90%. they ask people would you be willing to pay higher taxes to sustain sosa security benefits and 70 to 80% said yes. i don't see any problem with running a pension program through the public sector. what is the problem with the? it is usually popular. health care costs, medicare again. we are providing medicare health care benefits for seniors. that is also hugely popular. you have these tea party people out there yelling don't let the government touch medicare. they are anti-government but they want me
. musberger. >> that's where the sum is mitt will be taking place. for the second time today ben bernanke will come face to face with lawmakers who want his exit strategy from the drastic measures the fed took to keep the economy going. >> steve, what can you tell us about not annual what the fed chair said, but did he give a hint on where interest rates are headed? >> he did. he said what are considered on wall street, chuck, the magic words that the fed will remain exceptionally low for an extended period. that phrase has guided wall street's forecast for where the fed will be. it basically means the fed will not change policy for six months. you sat there, read the testimony. as soon as he said those words you knew they were safe. so the idea is the fed leading up to this had done some mechanical things that some in the market mistook for the beginning of tightening, but they were just what the fed called normalization. so the fed chairman needed to say that and he said it. what i think is because banking and regulatory reform is alive in the senate, if not the house -- remember, they
sanguine about this is ben bernanke. there are a lot of talking heads saying deflation. i worry about the guy saying greenspan's policies had nothing to do with the situation we're in now. scary. >> glenn: so steven, how much, how much did inflation rise up today? >> the inflation rate? >> yes. charles probably knows the number. >> 1 hadn'1.4. >> that's troubling. we're starting to see increase creep in. we learned you can't stop it from growing. >> 1 hadn't 4. that's for producers. they can't pay more without passing on the price. >> correct. >> glenn: 1.4, they said it was annualized interest rate. 16% or something -- did you see that? >> no. but it's starting to creep up. >> glenn: do you have that, steven, do you know what i'm talking about? >> ultimate multiply it by 12. if we kept it up for 12 months. >> glenn: correct. you have inflation coming up. the way to have inflation go down is to suck the money back, correct? >> correct. >> glenn: which means higher interest rate meaning what to the debt payment? >> service on the debt. this is the conundrum the government is in. you ma
we talk about where bin bernanke and i told congress we're going to need these authorities, and the difficulty we had at that time was as more and said better than i could. the arteries of the financial system were freezing up, and so i knew with certainty that business was going to turn down because when you have companies it is uncertain whether they will appeal to raise short-term funding. most of the cfo's are going to go to the ceo and say i may not be able to have all of the funding he would like for the next 30 days so what does a prudent company do? they start cutting back but the congress had an seen this yet so they hadn't seen it in their district so i knew with certainty it was going to get worse. i'm not sure i knew it was calling to be 10% on an employment but i knew we was going to be bad. so then, and i knew if they didn't do something in the collapsed, then the businesses wouldn't be able to find themselves, wouldn't be able to pay for the inventories and pay the supply years and would let employees the and the would ripple through the economy and we would
get it i want us to keep it and not lose it again. >> my name is bernanke. i almost feel that i asked for the microphone too soon begin issue answered the biggest concern that i have to rethink what happened in massachusetts needs to register with the republicans because they did not win this. the independents won it. i am from massachusetts originally and i know what drives that state and certainly is not republican policies. [laughter] i think it was a wonderful thing that happened and you put your finger on something come with the people in this country have said they're not happy with the democrats or republicans and if the republicans behave like the past the recent election means nothing prepare reading the "wall street journal" a few days ago there was an article that talked-about how the american people were disgusted with politics and the message i got out of that article said the republican party has an opportunity to rally around a central theme of term limits to get those people with professional politicians not interested in what happens to us the polygraph, bipartisanshi
. bernanke will lay out a plan for credit tightening. another big headline, former merrill lynch chief john thain picked to lead cit. it brings together two prominent casualties of the credit crisis. >> "the washington post" after the massive snowstorm, they are ready to get hit again tomorrow. >> the snow at their home was up to their waist. >> your mom has an art exhibit here. what are they 82? >> 82 and 80. and they drove up. >> once you have to drive through nazi check posts to escape the country, it's nothing getting through jersey. >> i was worried, but they are just fine. she has a big opening tonight it will be fun. >> my art exhibit was there last week. >> it was? did you show your postcards? that's good. >>> michael lke allen has the m playbook. the joint summit on health care. i like the idea if you think it will give the idea of health care reform momentum. >> well, sure. i think people in both parties wonder why now? we said on this show, one of the easiest things for the president to have done was to call republicans, turn on c-span, msnbc and say what have you got? he is fina
. there's been a huge decline in our confidence of the future, and ben bernanke has painted a grim picture of the economy for the rest of this year. you put it all together, you have a jobless and very weak economic recovery, bill. bill: here's what you guys talk about on the fox business network, and everybody, they write about it in the "wall street journal," about a double-dip recession. how do we know if that's true, if it's happening, or are the pieces adding up, like the jobs number today and the home sales number you talked about yet thato yesterday that came out for neb? >> we're all looking at future, what's the economy going to look like in six months. it looked like we were progressing nicely through 2010 with a solid rate of growth, now we're negative on how the company will perform in the summer and fall of this year. i don't say we're going to get a double-dip recession but we're not going to get the robust 3 percent and 4 percent growth people hope for. we might go up in the spring and then down a little bit as we get into the summer and fall. not good. bill: stu, thank you,
to come back into a government position and i know ben bernanke and hank paulson are well-known for this. could you talk a little bit about that in any ideas on how that could be stopped through laws or voter action or anything? >> i'm glad you reminded me about the revolving door. i see this happening. i see my friends do this. they dress like me when they are working on capitol hill and i see them two years later and they have really nice suits with a french cuff and offer to buy lunch. the left the capitol to up working for congress and a lobbying firm hired them because they knew that when the friend then calls his old underling on capitol hill to say hey i just want to talk to you about the farm bill, that his old boss or his old bosses colleagues are going to take the call and that is the revolving door. barack obama's said literally, i'm going to stop the revolving door. is white house chief of staff, rahm emanuel-- there is not, as the word for rahm emanuel because welby was working on the campaign is a chief fund-raiser he was getting paid by goldman sachs as a consultant at the
for banks in the country. host: ben bernanke referred yesterday to short-term political liability for this. guest: i think he is absolutely correct. people tend, under these kinds of conditions, to one to blame someone. the problem with that is there are plenty of people to blame. we deregulated the industry. the congress deregulated the industry. there was a culture, if you will, of deregulation. and this encouraged some of what i call speculative activities that led to the bubbles and then the collapse. yes, you had this reaction. i think it is an overreaction, and the outcome would be -- as you try to blame someone you get worse outcomes rather than better outcomes, and i think that is what the chairman was trying to communicate. host: does the banking committee and the members, are they right to be angry at the fete at all? guest: if they're going to be angry, i think they have to be angry at everyone, including themselves. they allow these organizations to get bigger and more risk oriented. and yes, and regulatory agencies because of this culture -- the regulatory agencies because of
that of course was going to burst, and this is why i get mad at people like alan greenspan and ben bernanke and most economists because god knows what on earth was going through their heads in the year 2003 to those of four cardinals five, 2006, to dozens of as the bubble could growing and growing and the savitt is okay and now they are surprised who could have known that is the joke we have or not washington they run around saying who could have known? anyone doing their job should have known. >> host: amity shlaes, anything you want to address? >> guest: i think it's important of the interplay and the war and domestic policy because when you have -- it's true the government can't think about two things at once. it can't walk and chew gum at the same time and when you have a distraction whether you believe it's something we should invest in, afghanistan, iraq or not the government doesn't think well what is going on at home so if he would have called on our various leaders at the fed or the white house over time under -- in this purpose it would be under president bush postsecondary 11th h
. your dreams. more within reach. meet us at ameriprise.com. >>> ben bernanke. >> yes. >> who oversaw the collapse of not only the united states, but pretty much the entire world financial system. >> right. >> and brought our economy to its knees has been reappointed as head of the fed. >> right. >> does this give you hope for being re-elected governor of new york? because may i remind you, he screwed everybody. >> wow. >> eliot spitzer taking shots from colbert last night. here with us now, founder, editor of thedailybeast.com, tina brown. >> good morning, everyone. >> great to see you. we'll get to your explosive piece about andrew young. have you quite a bit to say about john edwards' body man. we may have to bleep that. but first, maureen dowd's don't ask, don't tell op-ed. she writes in part -- tinea it was a pretty remarkable day on capitol hill. >> i thought it was pretty believing. very moving indeed. one does ask whether it will ignite a cultural war thing and distract. that's the only thing that scares me, we do need to be focused on jobs now. the timing seems strange. but h
as a country to have in place, hank, ben bernanke kumbaya tim geithner and sheila bair the head of the fdic. i know a lot of people and finance and business and government. i cannot think of for that would have done a better job. but to look back of our country's financial system throes of during that period. some of you were in a party i was that in 2008 when the talk, when you have 3.5 four more trillion held by 30 million people on a sunday night are worried about whether they can get their money, that money was half of all deposits held in the banks at that time. you have a panic. you have commercial paper frees up entirely and some of the biggest companies described in the book worried if they would be payable in a short period of time. the sixth largest bank in the country with the maastricht staged domestic deposits and the third largest bank, wachovia, i needed a shotgun marriage on a monday morning and it just arrived this. interestingly the bookstores early september when fannie mae and freddie mac worry essentially bart -- broke. the two institutions guaranteed 40 percent of all res
. jon: "happening now" in the top box. ben bernanke on the hill right now expressing confidence the economic recovery will endure. but he stresses the importance of keeping interest rates at record lows. knowledge crews meeting a jetblue in fort lauderdale. someone onboard was injured when the flight hit turbulence. in the bottom box the world health organization says the h1n1 flu outbreak has been less severe than expected. the group will review the status of the pandemic to decide fit has peaked. jane: this is a story that will interest you and may outrage. a convicted rapist has been charged in a horrifying new attack. prosecutors say william french sexually assaulted a woman twice in her home in the boston area. in between the two attacks he cut off a gps device he was wearing because he violated his probation. why after violating his probation was he allowed to remain free and just have a gps on him? you said this is not necessarily surprising, this case. >> unfortunately we have seen more of these kinds of cases. it shows a failure in the system. why aren't the level 3 sex
will be listening to what ben bernanke has to say as he begins two days of testimony on capitol hill. right now you can get a great deal on any volkswagen. well, the tiguan's great. mm. and the routan has everything we're looking for. plus, every volkswagen includes no-charge, scheduled, care-free maintenance. so, what's this punchdub days about? you know, where you punch someone in the arm every time you see a volkswagen. red one! [ baby crying ] test drive? [ male announcer ] with great deals on all 13 models, it's a whole new volkswagen. and a whole new game. ♪ oh, just come snuggle with momma! missing something? now at sears optical, get 2 pairs of glasses for $99.99. with bifocals just $25 more per pair. sears optical. don't miss a thing. ♪ [ male announcer ] every business day, bank of america lends nearly $3 billion dollars to individuals, institutions, schools, organizations and businesses in every corner of the economy. america. ♪ growing stronger. every day. growing stronger. and island music] ♪ fa-diddle-diddle-do-do-do ♪ fa-daddle-daddle-la-da-da ♪ fa-diddle-diddle-leh-dee-d
get so mad at people like ben bernanke. most economists, god knows what on earth was going through their heads as they watch the bubble keep grow and grow and grow and said everything was okay. now they are surprised fukuda agnone? that is a joke we have around washington. anyone who is doing their job should have known. >> host: amity shlaes anything there you want to address? >> guest: i think it is important to think about the interplay between the war in domestic policy because it is true the government can think about two things at once. it cannot walk and chew gum at the same time and when you have a distraction, whether you believe it is something we should invest then, afghanistan, iraq, the government does not think well about what is going on at home so if you called on our various leaders that the fed or at the white house over time under, in this period under president bush,'s september 11 you would say are you concerned about fannie mae? they would say absolutely, here's the data and they are going out of control, fannie and freddie and we will be have legislation abou
decades. he made money too cheap. a lot of people want to put bernanke on mt. rushmore because he's making money cheap and guiding us through this crisis. >> it does raise us to this issue. rates were so low under alan greenspan was part of the problem and then we had this giant bubble and the bubble burst. instead of letting the bubble go back to flat we've been huffing and puffing by printing more money and trying to help everybody and make it easier to try to keep it inflated a little bit. it has so many holes in it will go down here at some point. >> you're right. all right. international superstar erin burnett. how many points exactly is the market going to go up m. >> i hate this. >> we'll see if it turns around by the end of the day. we'll have a lower open. i'll make it up. up plus 30. >> wrong. up 72. erin burnett, thank you. >> have a good weekend, guys. >> that's all i got. thank you for being with us, erin. that $100 that you have, it's worth about $72 now. >> mika stole it back. typical democrat taking your money. >> she's liberal. all right. coming up, new overnight developme
not remember this because we probably didn't keep track of everything that paulson and bernanke and george bush did, but lehman falls on september 15, then what we have is on september 23 the chairman of the federal reserve and the secretary of treasury come into congress and they testify that they need $700 billion, they've got a 2 1/2-page bill, they don't know what they're going to do with the money, but if you don't give it to them then the world is going to end. now that makes you a little currentble if you're deciding what you're going to do with your investments. not only that, but the next day the president of the united states comes on national television and says the following, speak to the american people, just to get them, you know, calm down a little bit, he says, financial assets related to home mortgages have lost value during the housing decline and the banks holding these assets are are restricted credit. as a result our entire economy is in danger. so i propose that the federal government reduce the risk posed by these troubled assets and supply urgently needed money so banks
bernanke who was named by bush the federal reserve chairman, henry paulson, the treasury secretary. they said if they didn't do this bailout, the abyss would've happened and it wouldn't have been a recession, it would have been a depression. >> well, you know, a lot of people did offer that chicken little scenario. and equally other economists and people in the real banking world, for example, a communication i received from the president of bb & t asking the 435 members of the house and the 100 members of the senate not to vote in favor of the bailout because the money would not end up being used by banks to be loaned to consumers and you would have banks under the thumb of greater government control. and, indeed, though i don't like to use hank bolson as a source, he made it very clear that while mccain in the end supported it, when john suspended his campaign to go back to washington, and voters thought he's going to make a stand for us. john, instead of being the tell it like it is straight talk express guy, he meekly read a couple of talking points and went ahead with the whol
of making decisions on interest rates. mr. bernanke does testify regularly on capitol hill explaining what he is doing, and why he is affecting monetary policy the way he is. some, like milton friedman, have suggested that we could replace federal reserve with a computer that could determine these interest-rate formulas. perhaps that would be better. federal reserve policy can be subject to certain criticism. i do not hoknow how we would do this. there is disagreement on the way they have handled the recession, and that is fair. host: another tweet -- guest: $3 trillion of the deficit? over the next 10 years, if we expended all the tax cuts, for everyone, that would be about $3 trillion. the deficit is much bigger than that. the base line is $11 trillion. if you got rid of all the tax cuts, we would still have and $8 trillion deficit over the next 10 years. president obama is not talking about doing that. only for those making more than $250,000 a year. that is only 1/5 of the tax cuts. if you want to get rid of "tax cuts for the rich" it is over $16 billion from a deficit of $11 trillion.
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)